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  • Nanworimo 2009

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  • Nanowrimo Coincides with Semi-Annual ER Visit!

    Nanowrimo Rebels! It has begun! This year, I waited to see what writing needed to come out – fiction or memoir. And once again it is (drumroll please) creative non-fiction. I have some fiction in here somewhere, but memoir is in the way. So many stories, so few written down…. from this year and last anyway. Memoir now. Fiction later. And maybe they’ll collide, in the end.

    And so, even though am still disabled and am now in the sad, post-divorce situation where I must work part-time in order to make ends meet, I’ve managed to keep my word count relatively on track. Even more remarkable since I’ve had the flu this week.

    In fact, I finally called the MN state flu phone line yesterday after being pretty sick for two days – fever, icky cough, headaches, huge fatigue and body pain to write home about. If you know me, you know that if I’m complaining aboaut extra fatigue and pain, that’s pretty remarkable. The flu hotline nurse didn’t like that my breathing wasn’t as easy as it should be, or that I heard crackling at the beginning and ends of each breath. In fact, she told me I must go to the ER RIGHT THEN to be checked out.

    This was a huge mistake. I knew it at the time, but chose to believe the nurse’s concern. But I may have finally learned my lesson: In the US, do NOT go the ER unless you have stopped breathing or can’t stop bleeding. Or you are in uncontrollable pain. If you go with anything less than a life-threatening situation, they will make you wait in agony for five hours, then tell you, “Guess what? You are sick. Go home. Take cough syrup. Use a humidifier. Don’t breathe on anyone until you are all better.”

    This was the result after six hours of being ignored in a puke-scented waiting room, not getting the blanket, water, or pain medication I needed so badly that I was weeping say, 70 percent of the time. I would have been much bettter of at home. I’m pretty sure my escapade to get health treatment will extend my illness by several days.

    Especially disappointing was that my “primary provider” at this ER was a nurse practitioner. I usually love working with NPs, often finding them to be far more knowledgeable, open minded, and helpful than your average MD off the street. Not this time. She particularly did not like that I am disabled by Chronic neuro-Lyme.

    Within the first minute of our relationship, I realized she was bought into the Infectious Disease Society’s criminally negligent guidelines for treating chronic Lyme, and did not want to hear anything that conflicted with them. This had the, some would say, miraculous effect of impairing her hearing, memory, or focus when around me. She was clearly annoyed that I had so much information about my health and treatment options. I do not expect this in a nurse practitioner, especially at Abbott NW Hospital where I have had good experiences before. (Although this was my first ER visit there. And probably my last.)

    Well. What does not kill you makes good writing material. And material, dear friends, I have in abundance.

    I’ll keep you posted as the month goes on.

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